Secretlab Titan 2020: A Gaming Chair For Disabled Gamers?

For the purposes of this review, I’ll be talking about the Titan model of this chair but it is worth pointing out that you can buy this in two other models… the smaller Omega version and the extra-large Titan XL version.

The first thing that stood out when we got this chair was the ease of setup. Secretlab has really tried to make assembly a breeze with all assembly tools are provided with a cool little accessory box to store them in afterward.

In terms of the instructions, you get a nice big picture instruction display. 

Set up took around 15 – 20 minutes but would be quicker with two people. Wheels screw onto the wheelbase which is then inserted into the bottom of the main seat frame. The armrests come pre-built onto the frame and the backrest attaches easily to each side at the rear.  

Materials wise, what’s immediately noticeable is that Secretlab didn’t spare any expense on the 2020 model. Using what’s called Prime 2.0 PU leather, Secretlab says that the fabrics on this chair are up to four times more durable than any other chair on the market.

Cold-cure foam under the upholstery and the mold of the chair shapes to the user’s lower back. There is also a comfortable memory foam pillow can also attach and detach from the backrest.

In terms of actually sitting in the seat, there is an overall firmness with a solid underlay which makes for a different feel to your average seat.

Obviously, you’d expect that given this is a specialized chair and given it retails for over $700NZD.

Visually, the chair is striking. Wherever I put it in the house, be that the lounge or in my bedroom, the design truly drew my attention with a good balance of striking logos and a simple mix of black and red color across most of the frame.

That leads me to one of the criticisms many have of these sorts of chairs, is it just all for the looks? 

Well, materially and as a chair that you’d expect to spend a lot of hours sitting in, the Secretlab Titan certainly feels just as premium a product as it looks, but again, at a $700 NZ Dollar price tag, you’d definitely expect that and it’s a hefty investment to justify if you’re just getting it for the visuals.

I personally loved the look of this chair, logos are also molded into the plastic of the armrests which is a cool, albeit slightly meaningless point in the grand scheme of things. 

Speaking of the arm wrests, they can be moved sideways, from front to back, with height adjustments and a full metal internal mechanism. The lumbar support on the lower back can also be adjusted, and the chair can also lock into full recline which allows the user to have a power nap if need be. 

So, that’s what you need to know about all the features of this chair and how it will serve the average user. It is undoubtedly one of the best chairs on the market today and I’d highly recommend it for most people, especially if you spend multiple hours working at a desk each day. 

I even had a few able-bodied people try it out and they all said it surprised them in terms of how comfortable it actually was. 

But what about for disabled people such as myself who might be wondering if this can serve as a viable option for a seat when sitting at our computer? Can this possibly match up to A the comfort and B the support your wheelchair provides you? 

The answer is, well, it’s complicated and it really depends on the end-user. 

For disabled people who have a good amount of upper body strength, the posture support of this chair is great, but the bigger question really centres around those who may be more physically restricted. If you do fall into this category, despite the ability to move armrests back and forward, up and down, and side to side, this chair won’t provide the support you’re likely needing to move freely. 

For myself personally, as someone who has specialized seating on my power wheelchair as a result of very little upper body strength, I found I couldn’t do much when sitting in the chair unaided. Don’t get me wrong, it’s comfortable, it looks nice, but the benefits here are really for your average user who can do a bit more for themselves. 

This didn’t surprise me in the slightest Secretlab didn’t go into this designing a purpose-built gaming chair to cater for the physically disabled, but in terms of that particular demographic, the Secretlab Titan is a hard sell because it won’t be until you actually get into the thing until you know if it can meet your needs or not. 

And again, at just over $700 NZD, that’s a hell of an expensive trial.

Disclaimer: The Secretlab Titan was provided to us for review purposes.

Dualshock 4 Back Button Attachment Review: Not Really Accessible For Disabled Gamers

The Dualshock 4 Back Button Attachment adds a little more functionality to the PS4 controller and the wider gaming experience, but it doesn’t do much for accessibility.

Before we begin this review – two quick disclaimers.

I am a disabled gamer and I have a muscle-wasting condition called Spinal Muscular Atrophy. As you’ll see in the video embedded to this review, to say my hands are quirky would be an understatement.

With this in mind, I reached out to my friends at Sony to see if I could review the Dualshock 4 Back Button Attachment because I wanted to see if it will allow physically disabled gamers, like me, to better access gaming. They kindly agreed and shipped the product to my front door.

With that out of the way, let’s get into the review.

Almost from the get-go, you realize that the back button was not designed with disabled gamers in mind. The attachment is fiddly and tight when trying to connect and it took me several attempts to even get the connectors lined up correctly.

To connect, you need to hold down the latch (either with your thumb or another finger) in order to connect the attachment via the microphone in and extension ports. Once lined up, a firm push is required, using both hands, before the attachment clicks into place.

Whilst it is hard to judge exactly, as different people have varying levels of function in their hands and fingers, I would guess that many disabled gamers won’t have much independence when it comes to actually getting the back button connected and working.

Once connected, for me anyway, I noticed the controller was that much heavier in the hand. Not a lot heavier, but certainly noticeable.

But what of the gaming experience? I played the likes of Fortnite, Apex Legends, Project Cars 2, FIFA 19, and Crash Team Racing all at varying lengths during my time with the back-button attachment.

The tact-tile buttons are an easy press but don’t have much in terms of height, making it difficult for those who may not have good extension in either the ring or middle finger. What’s good about the attachment is that you can program it to map whichever button on the existing Dualshock 4 controller that you’d like, including the often-difficult press of the analogue sticks for parts of gameplay like sprinting or melee.

Using the back button for shooting and aiming in games like Fortnite or Destiny 2 will feel foreign at first but quickly became quite natural, however, the issue again is that this is dependent on the variable functionality in the hands of disabled gamers.

For shooters especially, many disabled gamers are already struggling to keep up the pace of gameplay.  

From a purely accessible standpoint, the overarching impression of this nifty addition to the PS4 controller is that it could be worth it for disabled gamers, but the risk of investment is high, because they’re not going to be able to discover that it can even come close to working for them until they’ve paid $70 ($30USD).

Yes, the back-button attachment may be just what they need to have a more level playing field using the controller, but for others, it could also be just the beginning of what they need and the entry to gaming may still be high and this attachment doesn’t address much of the issue.

Sony is already behind Microsoft in terms of developing hardware that is accessible to disabled gamers. They had an opportunity to catch up if a little more thought had been put into what is still a large portion of an ever-growing gaming market.

For me, the setup of it was all but too hard to do independently and I know it will be for many of my disabled gamer friends. That will immediately turn many off because what disabled gamers want more than anything is independence in their gaming.

Sadly, the entry point (in terms of connection) will already put up too barriers for many disabled gamers.

MY RATING: 5/10