I Can’t Quit Social Media, But I Can Do It Differently

Like a lot of you, the thought of logging out of all my social media accounts and “disconnecting” has flashed through my mind a lot as of late.

Also, like a lot of you I’m sure, I was left somewhat shocked by what I learned when watching “The Social Dilemma” on Netflix recently.

Even if you aren’t on the major social media platforms, or perhaps you are and you don’t feel being on them is a problem worth considering, I’d highly recommend you take a look at the documentary.

“The Social Dilemma” doesn’t necessarily expose these tech giants for their happy willingness to do all they can to keep our eyes glued on the screen, but it confirms what some of us probably already knew if we really stopped to think about it in the first place.  

I certainly don’t like to think of myself as some sort of lab rat being experimented on, but in reality, it’s hard to argue that these social media platforms all largely started out as experiments and took off to heights that even their own developers didn’t imagine.

Sure, any business is an experiment at its beginning, but few have the potential to contribute to the negative impact on our mental health that Facebook, Twitter, and yes, even Instagram can have on our population.

Anyhow, I didn’t start this blog to write a review of “The Social Dilemma” or try to convince you that social media is bad, I want to talk about why I’m going to make a consolidated effort to lessen my time on the socials and what that could look like.

I Can’t Quite Social Media, But I Can Do It Differently

It seems somewhat disingenuous to make bold claims of lessening my time on social media, whilst at the same time writing this blog and sharing it on social media for you all to read. How else would I share it? Send a link out via an email? Maybe text it to my closest friends and family?

No, quite honestly, the only place to share a blog is on your respective social media timelines and I can guarantee that it’s on social media that you came across this in the first place.

This blog is probably one of a few things you’ll read online today, so no, the answer for me (a freelance journalist and experienced blogger) is not simply disconnecting and walking away because I’d effectively be putting a bullet to my career.

Social media is here to stay, it’s likely only going to increase I’d imagine, and it’s definitely going to be a requirement for those of us who work in the information/news/distribution spaces.

So, I’ll be sharing the content, monitoring feedback to it, and doing by best to respond to intelligent comments, but I’ll also be finding a way to utilize mass sharing using services such as Buffer or Hootsuite to do the distribution part.

But why? Why, for me personally, is limiting time on these services scrolling up and down such a bad thing? Surely, as a journalist at the very least, I need to be connected and up to date at all times?

I hear and take your point, and this is the very reason why this “experiment” to reduce time on the socials isn’t exactly knew. I’ve tried before and failed.

For me, and I wonder for a lot of you who may either be in similar situations or are considering taking on the challenge of less time on social media, it’s not a matter of disconnecting altogether but radically changing up your time on Facebook, Twitter, and especially, Instagram.

Maybe it’s just me, and let be completely honest for a moment, as someone with diagnosed depression and anxiety I’ve noticed that Instagram is a major trigger for a meltdown because it visually shows me what is often the “best” of what others are doing or the “best” of what they have going on.

So, I started this “experiment” by logging out of Instagram and I’ve promised myself I’ll only check in once every other day. That feels like a good place to start as its Instagram which seems to trigger the most.

This morning, instead of checking Twitter and endlessly scrolling through my lists (in my case, curated lists with the latest in politics, rugby, gaming, and disability) while having breakfast, I decided to just use my screen time looking at the actual news apps to see what was breaking.

There is something odd about using Twitter, a platform that is becoming more and more clouded with mis fact and division, as the first place to get my news each day. Ok, granted, I’m fully prepared to admit that using Twitter will often take me to the same official news outlets anyway because I come across a story that I need to read (both out of curiosity but also because of my profession).

It’s just the other stuff that I could so without at this point in my life. I don’t need to hear about everyone’s reaction to the news, I don’t need to see why you agree or disagree with something that Jacinda Ardern said today or why NZ Rugby is a monster organization in desperate need of change.

What I do need is time to breathe, room to concentrate on my work which as a journalist, blogger and part time communications assistant, requires discipline that clouded, information overload with a side of some 1000+ live reactions flashing across my screen simply doesn’t provide.

I’ll start here. It isn’t about disconnecting, I won’t do that, I will check in a few times a day and continue to share my latest yarns, but I’m certainly not going to be scrolling up and down trying to find ideas for the next thing or using these platforms to latch onto others who can increase my professional cred.

Everyone, it seems at least, is an entrepreneur on social media these days, myself included in large part. Our thoughts have become the primary driver behind it all, and it’s what creates so much division, because how can we disagree and still respect one another when there are no parameters to what we can share?

I’m not saying that you shouldn’t be on social media. I’m saying we all need to put more time, and more value, on something that is beyond that screen that almost never leaves our side.

When writing this blog, it’s a beautiful sunny day outside. I spent my time between pages by taking a stroll down the street and enjoying the fresh air. Nothing happened, my career didn’t suddenly end. It felt great, maybe because spring is here and I’m feeling different.

Feeling Undervalued As A Journalist?

Do you have a shutdown ritual? Do you even know what a shutdown ritual is? According to a blog on mediacurrent, a shutdown ritual is a set routine of actions that you perform at the end of each workday to finalise your day and signify that your workday is done. Many of us need that full stop to end proceedings, and for many of us, it’s also the first step to beginning the next day.

On my phone I have a routine app that features the core daily tasks I have to ‘tick off’ each day. Many of these tasks are personal, things like taking a shower and setting aside 15-minutes for meditation, while other tasks are designed around giving my brain the information ‘fuel’ I need to keep myself updated with the world around me, like reading the news for 30-minutes and checking Twitter.

But one routine focuses on prep – aptly called the shutdown ritual.

Part of my personal shutdown ritual, and one of the core tasks I try to complete each day, is setting out exactly every work task I need to complete the next day. It’s not just the task I write down on a separate ‘to-do list’ app, it’s the exact requirements of the said task.

For example, I frequently write down “write Chiefs feature in 800 words or less” if I have a story due the next day or “research stats on disability employment” if I am preparing to pitch a project to an outlet. If I need to get guidance from an editor or talk through ideas, I’ll write something like “call newsroom to discuss angle X”.

The shutdown ritual also touches on personal appointments or tasks. Does my partner need something in particular from me on this day? I’ll write down exactly what she needs and the steps I need to take to deliver.

It’s all about the detail and the pre-planning is a crucial part of both executing these tasks. It’s also a core fundamental for my own sanity. Almost always, and trust me it happens a hell of a lot, when I don’t have a productive day (or even a productive week), it’s because I haven’t taken the time the day before to list out the agenda for said day or week.

You might read a task such as “write Chiefs feature in 800 words or less” and think that it’s fairly clear cut. But for me, the 800 bit is crucial because it gives me parameters, I now know the ideal word count so can begin thinking about its scope.

My list will also set out the exact time I will submit the story – usually an hour before deadline if possible.

I believe that the same idea can be applied to just about anything you do, whether written down in an app or not.

Want to know why so many people don’t execute on their work or don’t take that next step toward something bigger? It’s not so much that they fail, it’s the lack of attention to the how. For that, I have to give credit to a former mentor of mine and fellow disability advocate Jade Farrar, during our working relationship I marvelled at just how much time and energy he put into the small things that many of us overlooked.

I also have to credit some of the professional rugby players and coaches I speak to on a weekly basis. Their amount of thought and planning on game plans, physical shape, recovery and much more just makes the mind explode when you hear about how it’s all being put into action. A guy like Anton Lienert-Brown is a fine example of that, a deep thinker about his craft and the impact being a man in the spotlight can have on those around him whilst also knowing how to switch off and get away.

Cool Story Mike, So What’s The Point Exactly?

During these ever-increasing times, particularly in our work, it’s crucial that we allow ourselves to check it all at the door but not forget our value by underselling.

This may mean different things for different people, but for me, recent times have really forced a lot of reflection on the motives and value behind what I do, particularly as a freelance journalist. Just this week I went on Reddit and asked other freelancers about their approach to drawing a line in the sand and saying no when you start thinking your hard work is being taken advantage of.

Just a bit of context. The media business is short on money right now. Newsrooms are downsizing not expanding, journalists who were previously employed are now being asked to work as contractors and pitch stories on an individual basis.

It’s a tough industry at the best of times and, sadly, many of those who only care about the spreadsheets are putting editors in extremely tough positions by forcing them to let some of their very best writers go, or at the very least, take a hefty pay cut.

But for me, I didn’t actually understand how much time, energy and effort I was putting into my work for these different outlets until I did a bit of a google on myself. When you google ‘Michael Pulman Journalist’ it should take you to a site called Muckrack which pulls together all the clips that I’ve written for the various mainstream media outlets in the past year or two.

Turns out, I’ve done a fair bit of work. Then I began to think back to the process of writing those pieces that went on to be picked up by outlets and published in print.

It came down to the work, obviously, but it was also the quality of the process that was put around those particular articles. Few of those articles were rush jobs, looking back at my to-do lists from those particular dates showed me that I had taken the time to perform that shutdown ritual where I had the patience to map out, 1 what the task was, 2 when it was due, and 3 what the parameters for it all were.

Being a freelancer in an ever-competitive media space often makes you feel like you’ve got to be on the button constantly, ready to pitch a story at a moments notice and do it before anyone else, then get it written and out the door within an hour or two so it’s timely.

Some of that might be true, but a lot of it is also complete bullshit. Being timely on a piece doesn’t make it good, keeping up appearances might help forge good relationships, but the real work is often done in isolation where the outside influences don’t help deliver the final product.

You deliver the product, nobody else really holds you accountable if you are a freelancer. If you do deliver and hold yourself accountable to everything that’s involved in doing something of quality, you’ve got to understand that there is some real value in that.

When I posted on Reddit I asked a very simple question to some fellow freelancers.

Would you do all this and not expect to be paid? Would you provide that scoop and a quality, thought-provoking read for little more than thanks and handshake?

Sooner or later, you’ve got to flick that switch and stop beating yourself up over the things you cannot control. Speaking purely from the media landscape for a moment – you’ll likely have a hundred doors closed on you before one eventually opens a bit.

Guess how many times I had to work for free before any doors opened? I estimate that I’ve worked for free for well over three of my six years working in the media industry.

The doors started to open when I focused on the story, not the number of stories. As a freelancer, I’ve so often been guilty of focusing far too much on volume as opposed to value. If you’re motivated by volume and nothing else, you have no room to improve. I want to improve, I want to be the very best I can be at what I do, and yes, I want to feel valued by the outlets I write for.

So if you’re out there and you’re in a similar boat to me, please know you’re not alone. If you know you’re doing all you can then there is your value right there. Please do all you can to ensure your work is valued.

The Disability Conversation Must Be Open To All (Even Non-Disabled)

As a writer who occasionally attempts to delve into the issues facing the disability community, the argument of being allowed to speak about something is very real.

Whether spoken or not, the frequent rule is that your opinion only counts if you’re a part of something or afflicted by it. If you aren’t such, you should be cautious about what you say and cautioned before even saying it.

Attempting to simplify the complicated is a tough task because within that complication is often a subconscious reason and chain of history that led to it in the first place.

Five years of writing about disability issues such as funding shortages, leadership, service providers and disabled people’s sexuality has, so far, been anything but simple. It’s taught me a hell of a lot, but it’s always been a struggle.

In fact, I can’t remember a single blog or article that was simple to write and never has there been one that was simply received by what is a very complicated community. Continue reading The Disability Conversation Must Be Open To All (Even Non-Disabled)

New Zealand’s Responsibility To Empower Harder Disability Activism

A strong level of disability activism and the willingness to exert it should be a big responsibility for all interested in making real change

Activism (by way of a Google search) is officially defined as “the policy or action of using vigorous campaigning to bring about political or social change”. By its very nature, activism can be uncomfortable for many as it can disrupt many of the social norms (or the established way of behaving). 

Translating that to New Zealand’s disability community, what comes to mind about activism is it being an act carried out by the few, not the many. Disability has so often been referred to as something ‘special’ or ‘unique’, so then we should expect that it would be a good or well-behaved medium, which makes translating that into activism a real challenge. 

Advocacy (don’t mistake that for Activism) is strong in New Zealand and there are many people doing what they can to utilise their own platforms in a way that inspires others and creates a narrative about themselves and the community they serve. But as the narrative increases, so does the diversity of opinion about what needs to happen in order for disabled people in New Zealand to have their rights met.

Diversity is all well and good but when it becomes so noisy it leads to a weak level of productivity. Talking about a problem leads to an understanding, but simply understanding that problem only remains productive for so long before it becomes stale, and there is too much of that staleness breeding within the disability community currently.

Real acts of activism are limited to the brave few who often put themselves in danger of being removed from their own community in order to make the waves necessary to lead to a chance of change. Furthermore, what is deemed as the ‘right’ type of activism is so subjective that it divides many.

Compare that to overseas countries like the United States as the best example, established activist groups like ADAPT regularly take their local politicians to task over a lack of basic civil rights for disabled people. The strategies that ADAPT use in their activism campaigns have often included acts of civil obedience.

Don’t Believe The Lies, NZ’s Disability Activism Is Weak Compared To Other Countries (Even Now)

It’s hard to break down exactly why activism for the rights of disabled people doesn’t catch on as well in New Zealand. That’s not to say it doesn’t happen, but it is certainly lacking behind the example mentioned above. 

Firstly, the disabled population is significantly smaller, and secondly, New Zealand has no official Government legislation that protects and uphold the rights of disabled people, whereas countries like the United States have the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act).

New Zealand, like many other countries, is required to work with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and recently a report was sent back to the United Nations responding to over 100 issues found in how the convention has worked in this country. 

The easy answer is the difference in culture, but perhaps the real truth in all of this is a basic misunderstanding of what our human rights actually are. If you don’t understand those rights, how can you tell if they are being taken away?

The gross examples are, of course, recognised and acted on by both sector leaders and representatives.

Stories like the one of Robert Martin (New Zealand’s premier disability rights activist and a sitting member on UNRCP committee) aren’t unique or isolated, but they’ve got the power to capture the hearts and minds. Martin, an intellectually disabled man, was abused in state care institutions over the course of a 27-year period. He was influential in the shutting down of those institutions at the turn of the century and has since gone on to become the poster boy of the disability rights movement in New Zealand, and a major influence internationally. 

Empower, Invest In Activism For New Zealand’s Disability Community

But back in New Zealand, in 2019, attitude towards making change for disabled people still has a certain structure to it, and it’s one that desperately needs to change.

There seems to be an unspoken rule that in order to make a change, it must be done as a collective for the most part, where there is a general agreement that something is wrong and must be addressed.

The ‘mission statement’ or desired end goal can also be too general to understand and subsequently put the processes in place from a community perspective to make it happen (working together to put accessibility at the heart of a more inclusive Aoteroa New Zealand).

This is what makes for slower processes and ultimately weaker outcomes because nobody is really held to account more often than not.

Having established legislation and real consequences to not upholding it would empower a lot more people to have more gusto behind their questioning of why things are the way they are. Perhaps those people will be even more confident that airing their concerns will play a part, if only a small one, in making a change for the better. 

Again, the voices within the disability community are not silent, but they can be so much more empowered.

People will always be in situations where their rights are being taken away, nothing about that is exclusive to disability. As a result, there will always be a need for people from all aspects of society to be willing to challenge the structures that were put in place that lead to their rights being taken away in the first place.

Having a strong understanding (outside of just your own situation) and developing a voice that can be used outside of the traditional comforts of a group meeting or working group should be the responsibility for everyone in the disability community.

To not do so is irresponsible and it passes the buck onto the next person. There is already too much of that happening. 

Social Media: How Did It Become So Easy?

In the wake of the Christchurch terror attacks where a gunman live-streamed the killing of several innocent people, how has it become so easy to post such distressing content on social media?

Social media companies have a responsibility to ensure that disturbing content of a highly graphic nature doesn’t get distributed as freely as it has until this point. No user should be exposed to material that shows people losing their lives, no user should be exposed to material that encourages such acts.

There were examples of why this is the case prior to the terror attack in Christchurch this past Friday, and each of them ignored.

Will Facebook (amongst others) ignore again this time? One can only hope not.

Most of us are still catching up on understanding just how accessible social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are. Virtually anyone can upload content and it isn’t until it’s too late that the highly disturbing, graphic content like we saw in Chirstruch, gets taken down, well after it’s been seen by thousands of eyes.

The impact that is being had on people seeing that content in the interim can have serious mental and emotional effects. You’d have to be pretty strong, I would imagine, to not be affected by the sort of content uploaded by Friday’s gunman if it happened to cross into your newsfeed.

You’ve also got to question some of the ethics behind social media companies who often rely on bots to first intercept this sort of content prior to it being sent on to an actual human being. Is the high amount of content to be reviewed no longer an excuse? Maybe not, because if anything that’s rising, but something, clearly, has got to be addressed.

Social Media: How Did It Become So Easy?

It’s hard to predict how social media companies will react to this latest example of the platforms being used in the absolute worst way.

What exactly can be done if the likes of Mark Zuckerberg are to stay true to their original vision for the platform?

It was a different world, arguably a different society, that people lived in prior to the skyrocketing success of social media. These platforms are not used just to connect, but to share and inform, advertise and distribute, break news and kick start careers, plus bring people closer to the idols they admire.

How exactly do you change all that without serious regulation that takes away some of the abilities which had, for a time, made these platforms so desirable?

My guess is, none of that was considered to the level it needed to be prior. It isn’t beyond the realms of argument that much of social media was made accessible to the population in good faith. That good faith may well have decreased somewhat, but whether or not that’s how the bosses behind these companies feel is the bigger question.

When does enough become enough on social media?

I’m Disabled, My Possibilities Are Limitless

Just because a term may have an official definition, that doesn’t make it true or worthy to be fighting against.

As a disabled person myself and a passionate activist for the rights of disabled people, I’ve never identified with how the use of words like ableism is currently being applied. I agree that discrimination exists and that disabled people face a variety of social, economic, and educational barriers that continue to prevent us from having the equal platform that we’ve been fighting for.

However, that isn’t a concession that ableism is ok and should continue to be used in the manner that it is.

After 27-years of facing inequality in all the areas mentioned above, I am not convinced that the so-called ‘ableism’ as its labeled is a simple matter of blatant discrimination. Furthermore, I am growing uncomfortable with how we label non-disabled people when we ourselves are the first to be outraged when labels are placed on us.

Are we suddenly stooping to the same level as those who’ve labeled as? And if so, why?

Maybe I am playing devil’s advocate here, but further to my earlier point, I also remain unconvinced that the disability community should be using words like ableism, ableists, abled allies, and more in the manner that it is. Especially recently, I’ve noticed a big increase in the use of these words, especially how we are accusing non-disabled people of being ableists and placing the blame squarely on them for all the frustration we feel due to the treatment we often receive.

Take the recent #ThingsDisabledPeopleKnow social media movement for example. The number of times you would have read the word ableism in some 20,000+ tweets would stagger you, and I immediately argued that simply because a word has an official definition (aka ableism), doesn’t make it true.

It’s all about interpretation, and speaking of interpretation, some of the things I’ve read in recent weeks suggest to me that many disability rights activists are prepared to now start a war against non-disabled people and the institutions they serve.

Furthermore, our community can often get extremely angry toward the so-called “abled allies”, take the recent Crutches and Spice blog as a good example where Imani Barbarin wrote that “Bryan Cranston is everything I will not be accepting from abled allies in 2019”.

The question then becomes – is all this a result of years and years of frustration coming to a head and finally making some legitimate headway?

The numbers of disabled people worldwide facing discrimination cannot be ignored and this is not some made up myth. Speaking of myths, disabled people are educated and can bring a lot of benefit to the workforce. One of the biggest reasons this myth exists amongst some non-disabled is down to how invisible disabled children are in the schooling system. If New Zealand is anything to go by, many disabled learners are often grouped together in special education units separated from the mainstream classroom.

I’ve personally argued for years that one of the best things we can do to better serve lifetime inclusion of disabled people is by starting from the earliest moments of entering the education system and having disabled kids visible to their non-disabled peers in a way that doesn’t suggest some kind of poignant difference.

Disabled people are not special just because of their disability, and we are (in my mind at least) entitled to nothing more than an equal footing in all the areas I mentioned at the start of this blog.

But it’s how we go about achieving this equality, and we should always ask ourselves how productive the things we say within our own community are when it comes to reaching the eyes and ears of those outside of it. Personally, if I wasn’t disabled and I heard someone labeling me an ableist because of my ignorance, I’d do little to change my behavior because I’ve just been labeled something that I’d likely not understand in the first place.

Ableism Doesn’t Restrict My Life

Call me an apologist for the non-disabled, throw all the stats, state all the personal examples of your own personal experiences to back up why using these labels in discourse is appropriate because I remain unchanged on one simple argument.

That argument, dear reader, is a two-fold one. First, as disabled people advocating for the equality we crave, we must accept that a big key to success sits outside of our own community and will likely not be controlled by us, we don’t hold the cards and we shouldn’t own all the conversation, either. The cards sit in the hands of a productive, co-design approach to all levels of policy, leadership, and data that impacts and influences social, economic, educational, and really, all drivers of modern society.

Second, and I say this as a disabled person… one of the biggest keys to advocating and thinking critically about the best ways to achieving equality for disabled people is having the ability to place ourselves in the mindset of non-disabled people and think about things from their point of view.

Yes, we are frustrated and yes, we have every right to be. It’s beyond comprehension that in 2019 we are faced with some of the barriers that we are.

But let’s be productive about this. Creating a community, sharing information, and linking with people of similar mindsets is great. But what about where all of that goes? Where does the current level of discourse go in the long run?

Keep in mind, this is just one man from New Zealand’s point of view, but I choose to challenge myself first. As a disabled person, my possibilities are limitless. Literally none, and I mean none, of the success, failure, and missed opportunity I’ve experienced in 27-years has been down to my disability or the attitudes of those in front of me who don’t experience what I do each day.

I’ve just made a conscious effort to keep it real, trust in my own abilities and acknowledge my weaknesses, and not be forced into thinking a certain way about disability. As I said, my possibilities are limitless. It’s all on me, I am owed nothing and I work to make my platforms in life as equal as possible. That’s literally all I can do.

So, what do I think about terms like ableism? Simple. You get more bees with honey than you do with vinegar.

Why I Can’t Keep Quiet: Part 1

This is PART ONE in a series of “Why I Can’t Keep Quiet” blogs to be published over the next month.

I was on Facebook the other night and a friend messaged me and congratulated me on how I speak my mind about things. He said it takes a lot of strength to speak publicly about what you believe and not be afraid of the backlash.

My friend then suggested I should write a blog about this, and give my readers a bit of an insight into it all. I’ve taken him up on this and will be writing a series of personal, and revealing blogs that hopefully take you a little ‘behind the scenes’.

So to begin, I guess the first question isn’t really a question but a statement.

I am a loud mouth, I speak my feelings, and I am not afraid to talk in a public forum and challenge ideologies that I believe are wrong.

If you know nothing about Mike Pulman, know that. Continue reading Why I Can’t Keep Quiet: Part 1

Disability Organisations Use Of Social Media Needs To Increase

Social media is the best way to connect with people, and for disability organisations in New Zealand, it is heavily under-used.

CCS Disability Action and Parent to Parent, two of New Zealand’s most well-known disability focused community organisations have taken a big step toward social media in the last year. Every branch of Parent to Parent has its own Facebook page, and the National body has its own as well. CCS Disability Action Waikato and CCS Disability Action Bay of Plenty have regular content going on their own Facebook pages, but it has only been in the last year that this has really “stepped up a notch”.

Behind the scenes, both organisations are well aware that their use of social media needs to be increased.

It’s not like organisations in the disability sector are the only ones slightly behind on the social media front either. Nearly every business now days, even not-for-profit charities, need to be focusing their marketing strategies to the online spectrum, and sites like Facebook are hugely crucial because that is where the people are. Continue reading Disability Organisations Use Of Social Media Needs To Increase

The risks of outlandishness on social media

It is has almost become the norm for people now days.

Ohio-Man-Threatened-with-Jail-Time-for-Facebook-Rant_2

We wake up, have a quick wash or shower, and whilst waiting for that all so important morning coffee to be made, we are on our phones reading the online community newspaper that is Facebook.

Social media has been the dominant form of the internet for a long time now.

Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and to a latter extent the advent of bloggers on sites like Google Blogger and WordPress has seen it become possible for anyone to get online and share their views about the things that matter to them.

Wether popular or controversial, the platform is there to be used but some are not using it in the right way.

This is a theme that has continued more and more in recent years as more and more get online and set up social accounts which allow contact with anyone else.

There is a funny saying that goes “golly gee if it is on Facebook then it must be true”.

The thing about Facebook is that not only has it become one of the most common ways of communication, here in lies the danger of social media and why, even if we feel whole heartedly about an issue or a person, caution needs to be taken with what we post.

Facebook encourages freedom of speech.

But when that freedom of speech is used to target other members and share their own personal business, it is then quickly shifting to something controversial that could cost you in more ways than one.

Employers these days will look at your social media sites too.