I Can’t Quit Social Media, But I Can Do It Differently

Like a lot of you, the thought of logging out of all my social media accounts and “disconnecting” has flashed through my mind a lot as of late.

Also, like a lot of you I’m sure, I was left somewhat shocked by what I learned when watching “The Social Dilemma” on Netflix recently.

Even if you aren’t on the major social media platforms, or perhaps you are and you don’t feel being on them is a problem worth considering, I’d highly recommend you take a look at the documentary.

“The Social Dilemma” doesn’t necessarily expose these tech giants for their happy willingness to do all they can to keep our eyes glued on the screen, but it confirms what some of us probably already knew if we really stopped to think about it in the first place.  

I certainly don’t like to think of myself as some sort of lab rat being experimented on, but in reality, it’s hard to argue that these social media platforms all largely started out as experiments and took off to heights that even their own developers didn’t imagine.

Sure, any business is an experiment at its beginning, but few have the potential to contribute to the negative impact on our mental health that Facebook, Twitter, and yes, even Instagram can have on our population.

Anyhow, I didn’t start this blog to write a review of “The Social Dilemma” or try to convince you that social media is bad, I want to talk about why I’m going to make a consolidated effort to lessen my time on the socials and what that could look like.

I Can’t Quite Social Media, But I Can Do It Differently

It seems somewhat disingenuous to make bold claims of lessening my time on social media, whilst at the same time writing this blog and sharing it on social media for you all to read. How else would I share it? Send a link out via an email? Maybe text it to my closest friends and family?

No, quite honestly, the only place to share a blog is on your respective social media timelines and I can guarantee that it’s on social media that you came across this in the first place.

This blog is probably one of a few things you’ll read online today, so no, the answer for me (a freelance journalist and experienced blogger) is not simply disconnecting and walking away because I’d effectively be putting a bullet to my career.

Social media is here to stay, it’s likely only going to increase I’d imagine, and it’s definitely going to be a requirement for those of us who work in the information/news/distribution spaces.

So, I’ll be sharing the content, monitoring feedback to it, and doing by best to respond to intelligent comments, but I’ll also be finding a way to utilize mass sharing using services such as Buffer or Hootsuite to do the distribution part.

But why? Why, for me personally, is limiting time on these services scrolling up and down such a bad thing? Surely, as a journalist at the very least, I need to be connected and up to date at all times?

I hear and take your point, and this is the very reason why this “experiment” to reduce time on the socials isn’t exactly knew. I’ve tried before and failed.

For me, and I wonder for a lot of you who may either be in similar situations or are considering taking on the challenge of less time on social media, it’s not a matter of disconnecting altogether but radically changing up your time on Facebook, Twitter, and especially, Instagram.

Maybe it’s just me, and let be completely honest for a moment, as someone with diagnosed depression and anxiety I’ve noticed that Instagram is a major trigger for a meltdown because it visually shows me what is often the “best” of what others are doing or the “best” of what they have going on.

So, I started this “experiment” by logging out of Instagram and I’ve promised myself I’ll only check in once every other day. That feels like a good place to start as its Instagram which seems to trigger the most.

This morning, instead of checking Twitter and endlessly scrolling through my lists (in my case, curated lists with the latest in politics, rugby, gaming, and disability) while having breakfast, I decided to just use my screen time looking at the actual news apps to see what was breaking.

There is something odd about using Twitter, a platform that is becoming more and more clouded with mis fact and division, as the first place to get my news each day. Ok, granted, I’m fully prepared to admit that using Twitter will often take me to the same official news outlets anyway because I come across a story that I need to read (both out of curiosity but also because of my profession).

It’s just the other stuff that I could so without at this point in my life. I don’t need to hear about everyone’s reaction to the news, I don’t need to see why you agree or disagree with something that Jacinda Ardern said today or why NZ Rugby is a monster organization in desperate need of change.

What I do need is time to breathe, room to concentrate on my work which as a journalist, blogger and part time communications assistant, requires discipline that clouded, information overload with a side of some 1000+ live reactions flashing across my screen simply doesn’t provide.

I’ll start here. It isn’t about disconnecting, I won’t do that, I will check in a few times a day and continue to share my latest yarns, but I’m certainly not going to be scrolling up and down trying to find ideas for the next thing or using these platforms to latch onto others who can increase my professional cred.

Everyone, it seems at least, is an entrepreneur on social media these days, myself included in large part. Our thoughts have become the primary driver behind it all, and it’s what creates so much division, because how can we disagree and still respect one another when there are no parameters to what we can share?

I’m not saying that you shouldn’t be on social media. I’m saying we all need to put more time, and more value, on something that is beyond that screen that almost never leaves our side.

When writing this blog, it’s a beautiful sunny day outside. I spent my time between pages by taking a stroll down the street and enjoying the fresh air. Nothing happened, my career didn’t suddenly end. It felt great, maybe because spring is here and I’m feeling different.

Social Media: How Did It Become So Easy?

In the wake of the Christchurch terror attacks where a gunman live-streamed the killing of several innocent people, how has it become so easy to post such distressing content on social media?

Social media companies have a responsibility to ensure that disturbing content of a highly graphic nature doesn’t get distributed as freely as it has until this point. No user should be exposed to material that shows people losing their lives, no user should be exposed to material that encourages such acts.

There were examples of why this is the case prior to the terror attack in Christchurch this past Friday, and each of them ignored.

Will Facebook (amongst others) ignore again this time? One can only hope not.

Most of us are still catching up on understanding just how accessible social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are. Virtually anyone can upload content and it isn’t until it’s too late that the highly disturbing, graphic content like we saw in Chirstruch, gets taken down, well after it’s been seen by thousands of eyes.

The impact that is being had on people seeing that content in the interim can have serious mental and emotional effects. You’d have to be pretty strong, I would imagine, to not be affected by the sort of content uploaded by Friday’s gunman if it happened to cross into your newsfeed.

You’ve also got to question some of the ethics behind social media companies who often rely on bots to first intercept this sort of content prior to it being sent on to an actual human being. Is the high amount of content to be reviewed no longer an excuse? Maybe not, because if anything that’s rising, but something, clearly, has got to be addressed.

Social Media: How Did It Become So Easy?

It’s hard to predict how social media companies will react to this latest example of the platforms being used in the absolute worst way.

What exactly can be done if the likes of Mark Zuckerberg are to stay true to their original vision for the platform?

It was a different world, arguably a different society, that people lived in prior to the skyrocketing success of social media. These platforms are not used just to connect, but to share and inform, advertise and distribute, break news and kick start careers, plus bring people closer to the idols they admire.

How exactly do you change all that without serious regulation that takes away some of the abilities which had, for a time, made these platforms so desirable?

My guess is, none of that was considered to the level it needed to be prior. It isn’t beyond the realms of argument that much of social media was made accessible to the population in good faith. That good faith may well have decreased somewhat, but whether or not that’s how the bosses behind these companies feel is the bigger question.

When does enough become enough on social media?

Disability Organisations Use Of Social Media Needs To Increase

Social media is the best way to connect with people, and for disability organisations in New Zealand, it is heavily under-used.

CCS Disability Action and Parent to Parent, two of New Zealand’s most well-known disability focused community organisations have taken a big step toward social media in the last year. Every branch of Parent to Parent has its own Facebook page, and the National body has its own as well. CCS Disability Action Waikato and CCS Disability Action Bay of Plenty have regular content going on their own Facebook pages, but it has only been in the last year that this has really “stepped up a notch”.

Behind the scenes, both organisations are well aware that their use of social media needs to be increased.

It’s not like organisations in the disability sector are the only ones slightly behind on the social media front either. Nearly every business now days, even not-for-profit charities, need to be focusing their marketing strategies to the online spectrum, and sites like Facebook are hugely crucial because that is where the people are. Continue reading Disability Organisations Use Of Social Media Needs To Increase

Facebook Buying Out Twitter Seems More Logical Than Google

Twitter will likely be taken over soon, but will it be Facebook or Google who claim the prize?

It is fair to say that both Facebook and Google wouldn’t mind adding Twitter, once a monster power in the world of social media, to its resume.

Facebook has over 1.44billion users per month while Google+ is believed to have 2.5 billion users in total.

Buying Twitter would be a major ego boost for everyone at Facebook though.

Google already has full control and ownership of YouTube, the world’s most popular video sharing and streaming service that Google says has clicks from “one third” of all people on the Internet.

That is over one billion users using YouTube around the world.

Facebook taking over Twitter is far more logical.

Not only would Facebook take control arguably their biggest rival, but it would add just another missile to an already dominating social media platform that continues to grow and evolve.

Google+ and YouTube are simply not as mobile-friendly as Facebook has always been.

News Corp was also rumoured to be interested in purchasing Twitter, but the company was quick to deny any plans.

Twitter is currently worth around $1billion.